“Waiting For The Parade” Provides Very Good Theatre At Bas Bleu

Five Canadian Women Are Poignantly Portrayed On The “Home Front” During World War II

Reviewed by Tom Jones,
February 6, 2018

“Waiting for the Parade.” What is this? I was not aware of this moving story. This was my loss. Canadian playwright, John Murrell, was commissioned by the Alberta (Canada) Theatre Projects to write a play about Canada’s involvement in the Second World War. The result was his 1977 look at the war through the eyes of five women in Calgary who saw the conflict from a variety of prospectives.

Murrell’s play was not an instant hit, but went on to become probably the most-produced Canadian play in history.

The Bas Bleu Theatre Company rehearses their production of “Waiting for the Parade,” January 31, 2018.
© 2018 William A. Cotton

We meet five women who gather as volunteers to work for the war effort while Canadian men are away, fighting in the war. They are not a gaggle of best friends, but five women who have ended up together rolling bandages, preparing sanitation kits, and other items they hope will help sustain the far-away soldiers.

Their “boss” is the incredibly unlikeable, Janet. She is well portrayed by Lou Anne Wright as a no-holds-barred taskmaster, more interested in being self-important than really helping her staff. Her military-age husband has opted to stay home, working for a news agency that reports the war news over the radio.

The Bas Bleu Theatre Company rehearses their production of “Waiting for the Parade,” January 25, 2018.
© 2018 William A. Cotton

Wendy Ishii is a jewel as Margaret, who openly remarks, “I can’t stand that Woman,” (Janet, the boss) as the bandages must be rolled again –if they are not “perfectly tight.” Margaret is a widow with a son in the military, and another son at home who opposes the war.

Lauren Scott is wonderful as Catherine, whose husband Billy is “somewhere” overseas, but she has minimal news of his whereabouts. He has been gone so long that she begins to wonder how much she cares for him – noting that she really can’t even remember what he looks like.

Eve is well-portrayed by Dominique Mickelson. Eve’s husband is older than she is, and is not currently serving in the military. She is a young school teacher who agonizes that her young male students are more interested in joining the army than completing their studies.

Rounding out the intriguing group is Ellen Badger as Marta. Marta is a near-outcast in the town, as her father was taken away to live in an internment camp after German propaganda was found in their basement.

Playwright Murrell has produced a moving story, keeping the audience enthralled with each revelation of the five women. Not one “of the five,” but every bit a “character” in the show is the music. Some of the music, such as “White Cliffs of Dover,” is familiar, and is effectively used to provide various moods of the war as seen from afar. The women even take time out from the conflict to dance together!

© 2018 William A. Cotton

Direction of the Bas Bleu presentation is by Ami Dayan and Lou Anne Wright. Together they have provided an evening of great entertainment. The set and lighting are very effective. The set has been designed to be a “home” for each of the five women, as well as the meeting place for their volunteer bandage-rolling. Set and props detail are especially effective.

“Waiting for the Parade” is a warmly moving and educational production. News of American citizens on the home-front has been depicted often. This is a rare look at the lives of our Canadian neighbors to the north. Wendy Ishii, who is very good as “Margaret,” notes, “Part of the fun of these characters is that their stories are laced with humor, pathos, and resiliency as they live in the uncertainty of the future.”

“Waiting for the Parade”
Bas Bleu Theatre Company
401 Pine Street, Fort Collins, CO 80524
When: To March 4, 2018
Telephone 970/498-8949
Online:  www.basbleu.org

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