Mozart meets Manet and Mayhem (and others) in Loveland Opera Theatre’s Delight

“Cosi Fan Tutte” Is A Wonder Of Sight & Sound

Reviewed by Tom Jones
February 21, 2019

For starters, some persons were already on the stage prior to showtime looking at a large illuminated representation of impressionist painter Edouard Manet’s “A Bar at the Follies Bergere.” I was ready to join them on the stage to see the painting close-up, when I realized that this was just part of the show — a room in an Impressionist art gallery where viewers of the painting were actual cast of “Cosi Fan Tutte.”

The painting then came to life, and was even enhanced as the backdrop of the opera’s first scene.  It was just one of several amazing Impressionist jewels that serve as background for this delicious production.

This is a very clever endeavor.  With a secondary title,”The School for Lovers,”  “Cosi” is a delightful tale of true love going wrong and right and wrong and right.  Two soldiers and their fiancés vow their love is “forever” when a wealthy French aristocrat wants to prove them wrong.  He bets substantial funds that the “love” won’t remain intact when absence might not make the heart grow fonder.  He sends the two men off to battle, leaving their loved ones at home to find ways to fill their time and hearts.

Courtesy of Colleen Lee Photography

Whereas the first scene comes from Manet’s view of the bar at the Moulin Rouge, the second scene is even more wondrous as George Seurat’s “Sunday afternoon on the Island of the Grande-Jatte” is featured.  This painting is also the basis for Stephen Sondheim’s “Sunday in the Park with George” and depicts an afternoon of leisure on the banks of the Seine.  In the Loveland opera, the Seurat painting takes center stage, with all of the characters in place in the painting on the stage.  When the aristocrat sends the two woeful lovers and others in the regiment off to battle, the stage loses its cast and the painting loses its characters – leaving a painting of nature – void of all humans. This is extremely clever stuff.

Phoenix Gayles and Dana Kinney play the two women, Fiordiligi and Dorabella.  The soldiers are Nathan Snyder as Ferrando and Colin Williamson as Guglielmo.  The four have incredible voices and acting charm.  Robert Hoch is in fine form as the scheming aristocrat Don Alfonzo; and Mary Kettlewell nearly steals each scene she is in as Despina, the conniving maid and housekeeper.

Although I can obnoxiously retell plot lines of way-too-many Broadway musicals, I knew very little about Mozart’s Cosi Fan Tutte Opera.  Correction.  I knew NOTHING about Mozart’s opera.  This was no problem, as the scenes of the impressionists are so amazing that my interest never floundered.  Wonderful subtitles at the top of the stage kept me completely up to date with the arias, sung in English, and the acting is great.

Courtesy of Colleen Lee Photography

The cast is large, with six principal performers plus a large chorus, and an orchestra that played Mozart’s beautiful music to perfection. This opera is produced by Dr. Juliana Bishop Hoch and directed by Timothy Kennedy.  The orchestra and choral work are conducted by Adam Torres.  Set and Lighting is by Peter F. Muller, with costumes by Davis Sibley.  Mary Catherine Gagnon is scenic artist and graphic design is by Matt Myers.

Including the Impressionist period artwork as backdrop and scenery is magic.  In addition to the works mentioned by Manet and Seurat, well-known paintings from Monet, Renoir, Signac, and Van Gogh are highlighted.  The idea of having famous artwork become integral to the show was originated by The Pageant of the Masters production of the opera in Laguna Beach, CA.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s opera, with lyrics by Lorenzo Da Ponte was first performed in 1790 in Vienna.  The timing was unfortunate, as it was performed only five times when the death of Emperor Joseph II resulted in a period of court mourning.  It did not arrive in the United States until 1922 when produced by the Metropolitan Opera in New York City.

The Loveland Opera Theatre is to be commended for providing opportunities for student groups to become acquainted with the wonders of opera, without possibly being overwhelmed.  Several abbreviated versions of “Cosi Fan Tutte” are performed this month for such groups.

The Opera truly “has it all.”  It is a wonder of sight and sound, with glorious music and great comedy.  Even some thoughtful insights of what “true love” might just be all about.

“Cosi Fan Tutte”
Where:
Produced by Loveland Opera Theatre
On the stage of the Rialto Theatre,
228 East Fourth Street, Loveland, CO
When:
Cosi Fan Tutte-A School for Lovers – 2/22, 3/1, 3/2 at 7:00 p.m. and
2/24, 3/3 at 2:30 p.m.
Cosi Fan Tutte for Families – 2/23 and 3/2 at 2:30 p.m. (shortened version for kids)
Website: www.lovelandopera.org

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