“The Impossible Dream” Is A Spell-Binding Success On Stage At “Candlelight”

David Wygant’s Enormous Talent Brings Don Quixote To Life In “Man of La Mancha”

Reviewed by Tom Jones
May 18, 2018

For starters, the set is beautiful. The show opens at a Spanish prison dungeon at the time of the Spanish Inquisition where inmates have minimal chance of survival. The show concludes with that same set, but with the background opening on a sky of stars offering a tiny glimpse of hope. In between, the audience is provided with a feast of talent, glorious music, clever visual effects and some inspiration of what humankind just might become.

That “glorious music” includes the forever wondrous “Impossible Dream,” as well as thoughtful advice, and clever comedy relief with “I’m Only Thinking of Him” “I Really Like Him,” “What Does He Want of Me,” “Little Bird, Little Bird,” “Golden Helmet of Mambrino,” “A Little Gossip,” and my personal favorite “Dulcinea.”

David L. Wygant rules the stage as the poet-actor-tax collector Cervantes. He and his friend, Sancho, are thrown into the Spanish prison awaiting trial, charged with foreclosing on a monastery. The prisoners are a mixed-bag of criminals, eager to steal everything they can from the new inmates, and making fun of their naïve optimism of ever being released.

The prisoners decide to provide their own “trial” for the poet and his friend. Cervantes produces a manuscript that he has written, hoping to convince the group of his innocence. The manuscript is his tale of a befuddled knight of the woeful countenance, “Don Quixote de La Mancha.”

Cervantes then provides his “case,” using the prisoners to play the various roles. His story comes to life in this play within a play. There are sinners, merchants, barmaids, clergymen, government officials and even two amazing horses with personalities of their own.

Central to the story Cervantes relates are the woeful Don Quixote and the guttural Aldonza. She is a barmaid used for sexual pleasure by every man in the area. She is hard as nails, but Quixote looks through the exterior, and sees what she could be – a woman of great warmth and intelligence, with the beautiful name – “Dulcinea.” Heather McClain is rough-and-tumble excellent as the shrill Aldonza, not initially believing that she could ever be as wonderful as the Dulcinea of Cervantes’s imagination.

Cervantes’s skill as a writer lets him see beneath the surface of everyone – not accepting them at face value, but what they could become. It is a great lesson.

The musical was inspired by “Don Quixote,” a classic story by Miguel de Cervantes in the 17th Century. The book is by Dale Wasserman with lyrics by Joe Darion and music by Mitch Leigh. Wasserman has repeatedly reported that the show should not be taken as a faithful rendition of author Cervantes nor of his story “Don Quixote.”

The original 1965 Broadway production ran for more than 2,000 performances and received several Tony Awards, including that for Best Musical. It has been revived four times on Broadway and has become one of Broadways’ most cherished shows.

Scott Beyette has brilliantly directed the Candlelight production, with great choreography by Bob Hoppe. The wonderful set was designed by Halea Coulter, with Joel Adam Chavez as scenic artist. Lighting is by Vance McKenzie, costumes by Liz Hoover, sound by Mark Derryberry. Dave MacEachen is technical director; Victor Walters is music director.

The large cast is uniformly excellent. David L. Wygant and Heather McClain are the stars, but receive impressive support from the entire company, including Ethan Knowles as Sancho, Kent Sugg and Thomas P. Castro each in dual roles, Eric Heine as Padre, Ben Griffin as the Barber, George Lemmon as Pedro, and Leo Batlle as Anselmo – just to mention a few.

Late in Act 2, Eric Heine (as Padre) beautifully sings, “To each his Dulcinea that he alone can name…to each a secret hiding place where he can find the haunting face to light his secret flame. For with his Dulcinea beside him so to stand, a man can do quite anything, outfly the bird upon the wing, hold moonlight in his hand.”

The total effect is a display of brilliance which is becoming the “norm” in Colorado theatres. This past season alone has produced such great productions as “Sunday in the Park with George” at The Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, “Ragtime” at Midtown Arts Center in Fort Collins, and now the gorgeous “Man of La Mancha” at Candlelight. This is one of Candlelight’s finest productions in its ten years of providing quality entertainment to the area.

“Man of La Mancha”
Where: Candlelight Dinner Playhouse
4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown
To: June 17, 2018
For Tickets: Box Office: 970/744-3747
Online: ColoradoCandlelight.com

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather